James Como, “C.S. Lewis: A Very Short Introduction”

This short, 134-page book (and that includes references, index, etc.) is part of an Oxford University Press series of “very short introductions” that aim to provide “a stimulating and accessible way into a new subject.” The author’s impressive credentials are laid out on the book jacket: James Como is Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric and Public … [Read more…]

Art Lindsley, “C.S. Lewis’s Case for Christ: Insights from Reason, Imagination and Faith”

I was prompted to read this enjoyable and useful book by Louis Markos’s good summary of it (250) in his Apologetics for the Twenty-First Century: An accessible overview of Lewis’s apologetic arguments that is also a practical guide for modern apologists. Lindsley demonstrates that if we combine the many and diverse books written by C.S. … [Read more…]

John R.W. Stott, “Basic Christianity”

This was named a “book of the century” by Christianity Today and is frequently acknowledged as a “classic.” In his short foreword to a recent edition, Rick Warren writes: “There are a few landmark books that everyone in the world should read. This is one of the rare few.” And he concludes: “John Stott’s Basic Christianity is … [Read more…]

Don Richardson, “Peace Child”

This book was highly recommended, and loaned to me, by a member of my small group at church, and I was not disappointed. The book is about the missionary work done by Canadian Don Richardson and his wife Carol among the Sawi people in the western half of New Guinea, now called West Irian or … [Read more…]

Alister E. McGrath, “Intellectuals Don’t Need God & Other Modern Myths: Building Bridges to Faith through Apologetics”

The author of this book is both a scientist (with a Ph.D. in microbiology) and a theologian (with ties to Oxford and Regent College in Vancouver); he used to be an atheist and is now an Anglican priest. The central focus of the book is explaining how to evangelize to intellectuals, especially by familiarizing oneself … [Read more…]